This fresh Tabbouleh recipe is easy to make, and is full of fresh cucumber, tomatoes, and lots of herbs. It’s great on its own, as a side, or in a pita with Grilled Chicken Breast! Make it even better with a few Stuffed Grape Leaves, Marinated Olives, and a side of Baba Ganoush.

Tabbouleh - in a White Bowl with Spoon

Anytime I overindulge after a vacation or holiday, I find myself craving lots of fresh salads and fruit to reset my body a bit. And this tabbouleh is one of my favorite healthy recipes to turn to! If you’re not familiar with tabbouleh, it’s a fresh vegetarian salad made with bulgur, lots of fresh herbs, fresh tomatoes and cucumber, extra virgin olive oil, and fresh lemon juice. It’s one of the many staples you often see at Middle Eastern restaurants, and I love pairing it with homemade hummus, pita, tzatziki, and chicken breast for a full meal.

There is some variation in Tabbouleh as more of a parsley salad or a bulgur salad. It seems that traditionally, Tabbouleh is most heavy on the parsley, but as it has become more popular, it is often made with a higher ratio of bulgur. This is what I prefer. There’s still plenty of freshness bursting through every bite, but it has a heartier feel to it. Play with the ratios as you see fit, and know that you can adjust it at the end.

What’s Bulgur?

Bulgur is the main ingredient in tabbouleh, and it’s a cracked wheat product that looks like this:

Hand In Bowl of Bulgur Wheat Raw

You will likely find it in the bulk section of your grocery store, and it’s incredibly easy to prepare. All you need to do is pour some boiling water on top and let it sit, so even if you had no stove, you could still make this by using an electric tea kettle to boil the water, or a microwave.

Because bulgur is a wheat product, please note this is not gluten-free. However, I’ve tried tabbouleh using Quinoa and also Cauliflower Rice, and both are wonderful gluten-free alternatives that are also very healthy! 

Tips for Best Results

Use the freshest ingredients – It’s the herbs and vegetables that really make tabbouleh sing, so you’ll want to use the freshest ingredients possible. Herbs and produce lose their flavor the longer they sit in the fridge.

Make the bulgur first – Since the bulgur will take an hour to soften, it’s best to start that first, then wash, chop, and prep all the fresh ingredients. No need for mise en place here.

Dry the herbs thoroughly – Make sure after washing the herbs, that you dry them thoroughly. A lot of people make this mistake with salad, where they don’t dry the greens well enough and then the excess water ends up diluting the flavor of the dressing. Dry everything well.

Tabbouleh Recipe - Served in a White Dish on Wooden board

Step by Step Overview

To make the tabbouleh, start by pouring boiling water on top of the bulgur, quickly add some salt, and let it sit for an hour, covered.

Bulgur Wheat with Salt and Water Added

During that time, the tabbouleh will absorb all the liquid, and you should end up with a soft, tender texture that almost looks like cooked couscous:

Cooked Bulgur Wheat in Glass Bowl

Now it’s time to jazz the bulgur up. Parsley and mint are traditional for tabbouleh, but I also like fresh dill in mine.

Dill, Mint, and parsley in a Salad Spinner

Make sure to dry the herbs thoroughly, so you’re not watering down your recipe.

Chop the herbs finely, and also add chopped tomatoes, cucumbers, and scallions.

Chopped Cucumber, Tomatoes, Scallions, and Herbs in a Bowl

Not everyone uses cucumber for Tabbouleh, but I’ve had it this way at many restaurants and think its flavor profile and crunch fit in perfectly.

Next add a high-quality, extra virgin olive oil:

Adding Olive Oil to Tabbouleh Ingredients in Bowl

Olive Oil Recommendations

For the best results, use a really flavorful and aromatic extra virgin olive oil here. A few of my favorites are California Olive Ranch, Trader Joe’s 100% Greek Kalamata EVOO, and Lucini Extra Virgin First Cold Press.

Next add freshly squeezed lemon juice, for brightness and acidity:

Adding Lemon Juice to Tabbouleh Salad Recipe in Bowl

Give it a good stir, then do a final taste for seasoning:

Tabbouleh Salad - In Mixing Bowl with Tomatoes and Cucumbers

How to Serve It

Tabbouleh is definitely best when enjoyed fresh. I find that it’s not even something you need to allow to sit and meld for an hour before serving, and it’s best at room temperature so the bulgur doesn’t get overly firm.

Serve this on the side of main dish meats like Roasted Pork Tenderloin, Grilled Chicken Breast, and even Grilled Salmon. Or stuff into pita pockets with Baba Ganoush and Black Bean Hummus.

Broccoli SaladColeslaw, and Greek Zucchini Salad are some of my other favorite fridge-friendly salads to make when I’m craving something healthy. Enjoy!

Recipe Tips and FAQ

How do you store leftover Tabbouleh?

Keep in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 3 days. You may consider storing it in a fine-mesh strainer over a bowl, covered with plastic wrap, to allow any excess moisture to drain off.

Can you freeze Tabbouleh?

Not recommended. The raw cucumber, tomatoes, and herbs don’t hold up well.

Should you reheat Tabbouleh?

This is not a dish you want to reheat, because of the cucumbers and fresh herbs. Enjoy it cold from the fridge, or set it out on the counter for 30-60 minutes before serving in order to allow it to warm up slightly.

Can you make Tabbouleh ahead of time?

Yes, though I wouldn’t make it more than one day ahead, because the freshness deteriorates pretty quickly. However, if you want to make just the bulgur ahead of time, that can be done 2-3 days in advance and held in the fridge.

Did you enjoy the recipe? Please leave a 5-star rating in the recipe card below and/or a review in the comments section further down the page. Or, follow me on Facebook, Instagram or Pinterest!

Tabbouleh in a White Bowl with Spoon

Tabbouleh

This fresh tabbouleh recipe is easy to make, and has lots of fresh cucumber, tomatoes, and herbs. 
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Ingredients

  • 1 cup bulgur wheat* (dry)
  • 1.5 cups boiling water
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/2 cup fresh chopped mint
  • 1/2 cup fresh chopped parsley
  • 1/2 cup fresh chopped dill
  • 2 large tomatoes seeded and chopped (about 2 cups)
  • 1 English cucumber seeded and chopped
  • 1 bunch scallions sliced (white and green parts)
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • ground black pepper to taste

Instructions 

  • Place the bulgur in a bowl, then pour over the boiling water. Stir in the salt, then let the bowl sit, covered, for 1 hour, until the liquid has been absorbed.
  • Add the chopped herbs, tomatoes, cucumber, scallions, oil, and lemon juice, and give it all a good stir. Season to taste with salt and pepper, then serve.

Notes

*If you have a choice, choose a fine or medium grind. Try to avoid coarsely ground large grain bulgur unless you prefer a more rustic texture.
Storing leftovers: Keep in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 3 days. You may consider storing it in a fine-mesh strainer over a bowl, covered with plastic wrap, to allow any excess moisture to drain off.
Freezing: Not recommended.
Reheating: This is not a dish you want to reheat, because of the cucumbers and fresh herbs. Enjoy it cold from the fridge, or set it out on the counter for 30-60 minutes before serving in order to allow it to warm up slightly.
Make-ahead commentary: I wouldn’t make this Tabbouleh more than one day ahead, because the freshness deteriorates pretty quickly. However, if you want to make just the bulgur ahead of time, that can be done 2-3 days in advance and held in the fridge.
A note on timing: The bulgur will need to sit for one hour to fully soften. I assume you will prep the rest of the ingredients as that sits, so this shouldn’t take more than one hour to prepare because all you’re doing at the end is mixing in the rest of the ingredients.

Nutrition

Calories: 191kcal, Carbohydrates: 25g, Protein: 4g, Fat: 10g, Saturated Fat: 1g, Sodium: 405mg, Fiber: 5g, Sugar: 3g

Nutrition is estimated using a food database and is only intended to be used as a guideline for informational purposes.

Post updated in March 2019. Originally published in September 2015.